Fyodor Matveyevich Apraksin

Fyodor Matveyevich Apraksin

The Charity project aimed to perpetuate the name of Fyodor Matveyevich Apraksin was launched in 2009 when the country celebrated the 300th anniversary of the Russian victory near Poltava. That year the Centre of National Glory organized festive events in memory of Fyodor Apraksin and made the decision to erect the monument to Apraksin in Vyborg, the Leningrad region.

The Charity project aimed to perpetuate the name of Fyodor Matveyevich Apraksin was launched in 2009 when the country celebrated the 300th anniversary of the Russian victory near Poltava. That year the Centre of National Glory organized festive events in memory of Fyodor Apraksin and made the decision to erect the monument to Apraksin in Vyborg, the Leningrad region.

A year later, on June 19th 2010, the unveiling ceremony was held for the first Russia’s monument to our great compatriot — Count Fyodor Apraksin — which was erected opposite the ancient Swedish fortress in Vyborg.

The historical note

Fyodor Matveyevich Apraksin (1661–1728) was born to a noble family. Thanks to his family’s position he was at court of Tsar Fyodor Alexeyevich since his youth and after the death of the Tsar he continued to serve at the court of Peter the Great. Together with Peter I he participated in mocking battles and went on board the small boat which later got the title of “the grandfather of the Russian Fleet”.

He shared the ideas of Peter I and proved to be a successful builder of the fleet and a naval commander. In 1693 Apraksin became the Governor in Arkhangelsk which at the time was the only port in Russia where all the foreign trade was exercised. There Apraksin was in charge of construction of the first state merchant ship. In 1696 Fyodor Apraksin left for the south where he participated in the successful second Azov voyage.

Since 1700 Fyodor Apraksin was the Head of the Admiralty Affairs Department, the Governor of Azov and the Head of the Azov Fleet. During his activity the town of Taganrog was founded. Under the supervision of Apraksin new shipyards were constructed as well as fortification of the town of Voronezh against Tatar raids was carried out. Soon afterwards Apraksin was appointed the President of the Admiralty and at the same time in charge of all the military and naval affairs of the country. In 1708 Peter the Great awarded Fyodor Apraksin with the title of general admiral and involved him into the battles in the North where the war with Sweden was in progress. Apraksin was in charge of the Baltic Fleet and the Russian army in Ingria.

In 1710 Apraksin was given the title of Count and Actual Privy Counselor. At the same time he received the order to head the leaguer of 13 thousand people for their march on Vyborg. After two-days march along the ice of the Gulf of Finland from Kronstadt to Vyborg the Apraksin’s troops started the siege of the Swedish citadel. After several months of counterstanding, on 12 June 1710, the guards of the fortress laid down their arms. For this heroic act Fyodor Apraksin was awarded with the Order of St. Andrew the First-Called and a gold sword decorated with diamonds.

In 1711 general admiral Apraksin was again in charge of the Azov Fleet and then he came back to the north where he was ordered to head Estonia, Ingria and Karelia. Fyodor Apraksin was in charge of naval forces and troops on the ground; during the period from 1713 to 1714 he had a number of big victories over the Swedes. For instance, Apraksin was in charge of the Russian Fleet during the battle at Gangut (Hanko). Peter the Great called this first victory of the young Russian Fleet “The Naval Poltava”. After the victory at Gangut the Baltic Sea lost its title of “Swedish Lake” and the result of the Great Northern War became clear.